Ponoka cowboys sent off to Canadian Finals Rodeo in style

Ponoka’s best cowhands of 2017 were sent off to the Canadian Finals Rodeo (CFR) in style.A unique send off was held Nov. 1 at the Canadian Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame, which included Miss Ponoka Stampede 2017 Michele Greer.

The cowhands perceived are bull rider Wacey Finkbeiner, group restricting header Brett Buss, group reserving heeler Tyrel Flewelling, steer wrestler Chance Butterfield, secure roper Dean Edge, bareback rider Jake Vold, bull rider Tyler Pankewitz and group reserving header Levi Simpson (photograph inaccessible).

Greer herself is additionally competing for the desired Miss Rodeo Canada part and is now in the tosses of the opposition. The victor of Miss Rodeo Canada will be delegated amid the CFR, which is likewise the last one to be held at Northlands.

Ponoka Stampede Association president Blair Vold said the affiliation and the group is glad for the solid Ponoka unforeseen going to the CFR.

“I believe it’s a demonstration of this town and this group,” said Vold.”We’re one of only a handful couple of towns in western Canada that send such a gathering up to the finals consistently,” he included.

Leader Rick Bonnett included his congrats and adulated the cowhands and Greer for having such ability to feature Ponoka on such a phase.Ponoka County representative Reeve Bryce Liddle included that achieving such a level of ability and recognition is a respect significant. “Well done fellas, and woman. Appreciate it,” said Liddle.

He feels this experience will be something worth recalling.The gathering of cattle rustlers making a beeline for the CFR know this level of rivalry well.

While Vold may live in Airdrie now, Ponoka occupants still claim him as their own. This will be his ninth CFR run and he will likewise be making a beeline for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo for a third time.Bull rider Finkbeiner is positioned fourth by and large in the Canadian standings and is a moment age CFR qualifier. Pankewitz is the other Ponoka bull rider making a beeline for the CFR and this is his seventh CFR run.Tie down roper Dean Edge or Rimbey is making a beeline for his eleventh CFR run and he sits twelfth in the runnings.

Group ropers Buss and Flewelling will cooperate wanting to catch the title.Despite noteworthy damage prior this season, steer wrestler Chance Butterfield is ready for action planning to secure a win for himself. He sits fifth in the CFR rankings.

Also, Simpson sits first in the group restricting headers standings. He is making a beeline for his ninth CFR.The 44th Canadian Finals Rodeo begins Nov. 8 and rushes to Nov. 12. The topic is Hats Off to 44 years.COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – The PRCA is satisfied to report that it is joining forces with the Canadian Professional Rodeo Association and Northlands Coliseum to offer a livestream communicate of the 44th Canadian Finals Rodeo on ProRodeoTV.The Nov. 8-12 CFR will be solely communicated from Edmonton, Alberta, on ProRodeoTV.com. The communicate will be accessible through home PCs, portable PCs, tablets and cell phones.

“We are to a great degree energized and respected to be the selective substance supplier of the considerable Canadian Finals Rodeo through our association with the CPRA,” said PRCA Chief Operating Officer Aaron Enget. “This is a major open door for both of our associations.”There are six aggregate exhibitions of the CFR, with four night exhibitions starting at 7:30 p.m. (MT) on Nov. 8-11. There are additionally 1 p.m. exhibitions on Nov. 11-12, with the last being the last round of the rodeo.

Viewing the CFR livestream is as simple as signing on to www.prorodeotv.com and agreeing to accept a membership. Notwithstanding CFR scope, ProRodeoTV offers an assortment of premium chronicled rodeo film, including recordings of past Wrangler National Finals Rodeo exhibitions. ProRodeoTV will livestream more than 20 rodeos amid the 2018 season, and also the 2017 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo introduced by Polaris RANGER – live universally, and on a 12-hour delay locally.

“The CPRA and our accomplices at Northlands are eager to convey the CFR live to the web indeed this year,” said Jeff Robson, CPRA representative. “With the assistance of the PRCA, the watchers will get an uncommon item at a reasonable cost. We would like to develop this association and convey the CFR to the majority for the fans who can’t go to the rodeo. Pay-Per-View live gushing is an awesome approach to expand our fan base.”

“There is noteworthy interest for the CFR to be accessible through livestreaming,” CPRA President Terry Cooke included. “We’re upbeat to work with the PRCA and Edmonton Northlands on this undertaking which will give another road to ProRodeo fans to make the most of our game.”ProRodeoTV bundles to stream the CFR are $29.99 (USD), which incorporates each of the six exhibitions.

NFR Rodeo 2017 Live

Who else is ready for the 2017 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo?This year’s Super Bowl of professional rodeo will feature 11 Utah contestants — including three of the saddle bronc-riding Wrights from Milford — when the world’s best cowboys and cowgirls converge on the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas. The top 15 contestants in each event qualified for the NFR following a grueling regular season that ended Sept. 30 after hundreds of rodeos across the United States and Canada.The 10-day NFR will run Dec. 7-16, with each nightly performance set to be televised live on the CBS Sports Network. The channel’s 2017 NFR preview show will air Nov. 12 at 4:30 p.m. and re-play at 11 that night.

A matter of fact

• Beaver’s CoBurn Bradshaw pocketed more money than any Utah contestant during the regular season, finishing third in saddle bronc with $124,115. The only contestants ahead of him in the standings are the last two world champions: Texas cowboy Jacobs Crawley ($184,052) and Canadian cowboy Zeke Thurston ($170,456.)

• Plain City’s J.C. Malone and Santaquin’s Mason Clements will make their NFR debuts. Malone qualified 10th in tie-down roping, with $86,299 in winnings, and Clements earned the 15th and final spot in bareback with $86,114.

• Milford’s Jesse Wright, the 2012 world saddle bronc champion who qualified 14th this year with $76,630 in winnings, will be Utah’s most experienced hand at the NFR. He’s making his seventh finals appearance.

• Utah has contestants in six of the NFR’s seven events: Saddle bronc riding (4), bareback riding and bull riding (2), steer wrestling, tie-down roping and barrel racing (1).

• 3: Tremonton’s Baylor Roche, sixth in steer wrestling ($99,340), and Honeyville’s Tim Bingham, seventh in bull riding ($106,188), will both be making their third straight NFR appearances.

• 5: The number of rounds won at last year’s NFR by Milford’s Ryder Wright, who ended up fourth in the world after qualifying in 14th place. This year, Wright pocketed $99,361 during the regular season to qualify in the eighth position.

• 6: The number of NFR appearances for Tremonton’s Caleb Bennett, who qualified sixth in bareback riding ($106,677), and Milford’s Jake Wright, 10th in saddle bronc ($91,745).

• 1,931: The difference, in dollars, between 15th and 16th place in the barrel racing standings. Roosevelt’s Kimmie Wall ($76,294) ended up on the right side of the equation to earn her second consecutive trip to Las Vegas.

• 120,963: The total season earnings, in dollars, for Randlett’s Joe Frost, who will head to Las Vegas in fifth place in the bull riding standings.

Rodeo: Taos Muncy bounces back as a No. 1-ranked circuit cowboy

Veteran saddle bronc rider Taos Muncy of tiny Corona, New Mexico, has qualified for the PRCA National Circuit Finals Rodeo six times in his 11-year pro career, and yet he’s still had to take the good with the bad.

After suffering from a nagging groin injury in 2016, the two-time world champion’s back in prime form this fall.

On Thursday night at Prescott Valley Event Center (PVEC), the Turquoise Circuit’s No. 1-ranked Muncy began his quest for a seventh career berth into the circuit nationals at the three-day PRCA Turquoise Circuit Finals. PVEC, in its inaugural year hosting the finals, welcomed a select group of cowboys and cowgirls who fared the best at Arizona- and New Mexico-based rodeos in 2017.

“It’s always nice to make it to the circuit finals,” said Muncy, who rode a quality horse named Dakota Babe in his first go-round here Thursday. “I’ve been here for the [Prescott Frontier Days] rodeo, but I’ve never got to hang out. I get to the rodeo, and I’m there for maybe 45 minutes tops and I hop in the pickup and leave. It’s real exciting this year to be here and not have to leave for three days.

“My family’s with me, and we’re just going to enjoy the time up here.”

At 7 tonight, for the second go-round, Muncy will ride a different horse. He’ll ride still another in Saturday night’s final round. The average score on those three rides determines the Turquoise Circuit champion.

Muncy, 30, has won buckles at nine different rodeos this season, including Payson and Yuma, and he has captured co-championships at four others.

Turquoise Circuit Finals team roper Chase Massengill of Santa Fe, New Mexico, has known Muncy since they competed together at junior rodeo and high school rodeo.

Massengill said Muncy team roped and calf roped as a boy.

“He grew up on a ranch; he just understood his whole life he’s an athlete,” Massengill added.

This season, Muncy finished 13th in the PRCA world standings with $88,401 in earnings. Muncy’s preparing for his ninth all-time appearance at the National Finals Rodeo (NFR) in Las Vegas in December after qualifying as one of the world’s Top 15 bronc riders. The regular season ended Sept. 30, so any winnings here count toward qualifying for the 2018 NFR.

After the Turquoise Circuit Finals, Muncy will take time off from rodeo competition. In the meantime, he’ll practice riding and stay busy working in the family business, which involves shipping cows from its New Mexico ranch to customers.

“I probably won’t go anywhere until the Finals [NFR],” he said. “I’m going to stay home, and I’ve got a few practice horses. I’ll kind of get on them once or twice a month.”

OVERCOMING INJURIES

From 2009-2015, Muncy made seven straight appearances at the NFR. World champion in 2007 and 2011, Muncy seems as motivated as ever for return trips to the NFR and the National Circuit Finals, scheduled for next April in Kissimmee, Florida. He’ll no doubt remember the determination required to reach this point. For example, in 2008 and 2009, respectively, Muncy suffered a broken right leg in Red Bluff, California, and a fractured ankle in Utopia, Texas.

“I’ve broken my right ankle three or four times,” Muncy said. “It’s always difficult. When I broke my leg, it was right after I won the world in ’07, so I was really disappointed in that. I broke it really bad, and so I didn’t know how good and strong it was going to be.”

Despite those setbacks, Muncy’s persevered.

He had to bounce back again in 2016 due to an aching groin. At the Caldwell, Idaho, rodeo that year, Muncy completely tore that muscle. He waited about a month before trying to ride in Albuquerque, a two-hour drive from Corona, thinking he still had a chance to qualify for the NFR.

“When I got on, I re-tore it again,” Muncy said. “I took six months off. In January [2017], I felt real rusty. And then it kinda picked up in July. I just started winning. I was finally healthy, and remembering to have fun and do my job.”

During those months on the shelf, Muncy spent more time with his wife, Marissa, and their two children.

“It really didn’t disappoint me too much,” he said. “I’m fortunate enough to do this for a living.”

RODEO IN HIS BLOOD

The 5-foot-10, 155-pound Muncy grew up in a rodeo household. His father, Blaine, competed in bareback, saddle bronc and bull riding, and his mother, Johnnie, was a breakaway roper and barrel racer. His sister, Jordan, who won a National High School Finals championship in barrel racing in 2006, today coaches rodeo at New Mexico Highlands University in Las Vegas, New Mexico.

“When I was about a year old, I remember being at the Socorro [New Mexico rodeo] arena and my three cousins gettin’ on broncs and bulls, and what-not, and thinking that’s what I was going to do,” Muncy said. “I never thought twice about it. I just wanted to be a cowboy. It led to bronc riding, and I love it.”

UP NEXT

The Turquoise Circuit Finals’ second performance starts at 7 tonight, Oct. 6, at Prescott Valley Event Center.

Finals conclude with the third performance at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 7.

PV Event Center’s doors open at 5:30 p.m. today and Saturday, with pre-parties and live music scheduled for 5-7:30 p.m. in the main concourse. Ticket prices for each performance range from $10 to $40, depending on seat location. Performances run for two-plus hours.

Utah NFR: Who’s going to Las Vegas?

Who else is ready for the 2017 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo?This year’s Super Bowl of professional rodeo will feature 11 Utah contestants — including three of the saddle bronc-riding Wrights from Milford — when the world’s best cowboys and cowgirls converge on the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas. The top 15 contestants in each event qualified for the NFR following a grueling regular season that ended Sept. 30 after hundreds of rodeos across the United States and Canada.

2016 NFR recap: Pro rodeo: Utah dominates NFR saddle bronc riding

The 10-day NFR will run Dec. 7-16, with each nightly performance set to be televised live on the CBS Sports Network. The channel’s 2017 NFR preview show will air Nov. 12 at 4:30 p.m. and re-play at 11 that night.

An NFR primer for Utah rodeo fans:

A matter of fact

• Beaver’s CoBurn Bradshaw pocketed more money than any Utah contestant during the regular season, finishing third in saddle bronc with $124,115. The only contestants ahead of him in the standings are the last two world champions: Texas cowboy Jacobs Crawley ($184,052) and Canadian cowboy Zeke Thurston($170,456.)

• Plain City’s J.C. Malone and Santaquin’s Mason Clements will make their NFR debuts. Malone qualified 10th in tie-down roping, with $86,299 in winnings, and Clements earned the 15th and final spot in bareback with $86,114.

• Milford’s Jesse Wright, the 2012 world saddle bronc champion who qualified 14th this year with $76,630 in winnings, will be Utah’s most experienced hand at the NFR. He’s making his seventh finals appearance.

• Utah has contestants in six of the NFR’s seven events: Saddle bronc riding (4), bareback riding and bull riding (2), steer wrestling, tie-down roping and barrel racing (1).

• 3: Tremonton’s Baylor Roche, sixth in steer wrestling ($99,340), and Honeyville’s Tim Bingham, seventh in bull riding ($106,188), will both be making their third straight NFR appearances.

• 5: The number of rounds won at last year’s NFR by Milford’s Ryder Wright, who ended up fourth in the world after qualifying in 14th place. This year, Wright pocketed $99,361 during the regular season to qualify in the eighth position.

• 6: The number of NFR appearances for Tremonton’sCaleb Bennett, who qualified sixth in bareback riding ($106,677), and Milford’s Jake Wright, 10th in saddle bronc ($91,745).

• 1,931: The difference, in dollars, between 15th and 16th place in the barrel racing standings. Roosevelt’s Kimmie Wall ($76,294) ended up on the right side of the equation to earn her second consecutive trip to Las Vegas.

• 120,963: The total season earnings, in dollars, for Randlett’s Joe Frost, who will head to Las Vegas in fifth place in the bull riding standings.

ProRodeoTV to livestream Canadian Finals Rodeo

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – The PRCA is pleased to announce that it is partnering with the Canadian Professional Rodeo Association and Northlands Coliseum to offer a livestream broadcast of the 44th Canadian Finals Rodeo on ProRodeoTV.

The Nov. 8-12 CFR will be exclusively broadcasted from Edmonton, Alberta, on ProRodeoTV.com. The broadcast will be available via home computers, laptops, tablets and smartphones.

“We are extremely excited and honored to be the exclusive content provider of the great Canadian Finals Rodeo through our relationship with the CPRA,” said PRCA Chief Operating Officer Aaron Enget. “This is a big opportunity for both of our associations.”

There are six total performances of the CFR, with four night performances beginning at 7:30 p.m. (MT) on Nov. 8-11. There are also 1 p.m. performances on Nov. 11-12, with the latter being the final round of the rodeo.

Watching the CFR livestream is as easy as logging on to www.prorodeotv.com and signing up for a subscription. In addition to CFR coverage, ProRodeoTV offers a variety of premium archived rodeo footage, including videos of past Wrangler National Finals Rodeo performances. ProRodeoTV will livestream more than 20 rodeos during the 2018 season, as well as the 2017 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo presented by Polaris RANGER – live internationally, and on a 12-hour delay domestically.

“The CPRA and our partners at Northlands are excited to bring the CFR live to the internet once again this year,” said Jeff Robson, CPRA spokesman. “With the help of the PRCA, the viewers will get an exceptional product at an affordable price. We hope to grow this partnership and bring the CFR to the masses for the fans who are unable to attend the rodeo. Pay-Per-View live streaming is a great way to broaden our fan base.”

“There is significant demand for the CFR to be available via livestreaming,” CPRA President Terry Cooke added. “We’re happy to work with the PRCA and Edmonton Northlands on this endeavor which will provide another avenue for ProRodeo fans to enjoy our sport.”

ProRodeoTV packages to stream the CFR are $29.99 (USD), which includes all six performances.